integration of educational outputs of STEM approach and the requirements of comprehensive and sustainable development

  • Ibrahiem Mohammed Abdullah Professor of Mathematics Education at Shagraa Saud University
Keywords: educational outputs, STEM approach, comprehensive and sustainable development

Abstract

Abstract: This paper aims to know the relationship between the integration of educational outputs of the STEM approach and the requirements of comprehensive and sustainable development, where achieving the requirements of comprehensive and sustainable development is of a great importance to all countries without exception. This is simply because communities aspire to achieve economic, social, political and environmental development to ensure the highest life conditions. It is the responsibility of educational institutions to develop integrated curricula that meet these requirements and provide communities with human competencies capable of achieving inclusive and sustainable development. The study is based on the descriptive and analytical approach, which emphasizes and analyzing the related literatures and previous studies, and observation the phenomenon of the study, and the study includes several topics: the concept of the STEM entrance, its objectives and justifications. The second: the concept of comprehensive and sustainable development and its requirements, and the third: the relationship between the integration of educational outputs of the STEM approach and the requirements of comprehensive and sustainable development.

Key Words: educational outputs, STEM approach, comprehensive and sustainable development

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Author Biography

Ibrahiem Mohammed Abdullah, Professor of Mathematics Education at Shagraa Saud University

Professor of Mathematics Education at Shagraa Saud University

References

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Published
2020-06-15
How to Cite
Abdullah, I. (2020). integration of educational outputs of STEM approach and the requirements of comprehensive and sustainable development. International Journal of Research in Educational Sciences. (IJRES), 3(3), 197 -222. Retrieved from https://www.iafh.net/index.php/IJRES/article/view/224
Section
Articles