Oriented program through Action Research for Biology teachers to develop their meaningful aesthetic understanding of biology and acquire the Education for Sustainable Development requirements

  • Amany M Abuzied Lecturer of Curricula and instruction of Science Education, College of Education, Ain Shams University, Egypt. dr.amany_abuzied@yahoo.com
Keywords: Aesthetic understanding, Education for sustainable development, Action research

Abstract

Abstract: This study reports on Egyptian Secondary- stage (high school) Biology teachers’ experiences in action research through an oriented- training program focus on aesthetic understanding and education for sustainable development (ESD). The Program applied in the second/ spring semester of the academic year 2017/2018, four-hours weekly per 5 weeks.  The research problem stated in the shortage of acquiring aesthetic understanding and Education for sustainable development requirements for biology teachers. Throughout the research, five teachers were trained through the oriented program to promote their meaningful aesthetic understanding of biology and acquire the ESD requirements through action research in their classrooms. The framework that guided this study based on experiential, constructivist and transformative learning theories known collectively as “Exp-Con-Tran”. A mixed methods were used where teachers’ responses through qualitative and quantitative tools that are: Firstly: The Qualitative instruments, which are: 1- A Mind Map in which Biology teachers were asked to construct a mind map of aesthetic understanding concepts and ESD requirements before and after engaging in the action research.  2- Project- based learning Form: A qualitative tool with determined criteria to assess the ability of biology teacher after learning the oriented program to design a topic from biology curriculum in a project form according to the aesthetic and ESD pedagogy with passion development requirements. 3-Reflection Questionnaire (RQ): a qualitative tool with three Open-ended questions documented the teachers’ perspectives on how they received their experience through the action research stages. Secondly: The quantitative instruments, which are 1- An aesthetic understanding questionnaire 2-An Education for Sustainable Development Questionnaire. The former was to probe the cognitive of the participants had in relation to the concepts of aesthetic understanding before and after involving in the action research program. The second instrument used to identify participants’ attitudes towards teaching for ESD and their knowledge of classroom pedagogical practices. Statistical data analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 9) applied to detect the significance difference between the mean score of teachers’ pre and post results in (Mind map, aesthetic questionnaire and ESD questionnaire). The results indicate that teachers in their post-results recorded better cognitive organization for the concepts of aesthetic understanding in biology; positive attitudes towards teaching for ESD classroom-teaching practices at (0.05) level. The results of reflective questionnaire and the Problem- based form analyzed qualitatively and recorded positive attitudes in the post results. Involvement in the action research projects where teachers were experiencing, reflecting, conceptualizing, constructing, acting and transforming may be responsible for these results, so it is recommended to involve teachers more in the action researches in many fields.

Key words: Aesthetic understanding, Education for sustainable development (ESD) and Action research.

Author Biography

Amany M Abuzied, Lecturer of Curricula and instruction of Science Education, College of Education, Ain Shams University, Egypt. dr.amany_abuzied@yahoo.com

Lecturer of Curricula and instruction of Science Education, College of Education, Ain Shams University, Egypt. dr.amany_abuzied@yahoo.com

References

References
 Abrams, E.; Middleton, M. & Benson, J. (2009). The development of motivation and academic identity for science learning in early adolescents from indigenous communities. In Proceeding of The National Association for Research in Science Teaching’s Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA, USA, April, pp.17-21.
 Anderhag, P. (2017). “Taste for science: A Bourdieu-Pragmatism approach to interest, aesthetics and learning” Bellocchi, A., Quigley, C.& Otrel, K.(Eds.), Exploring Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education Research, Cultural Studies of Science Education, v. 3, (pp. 39-52). Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-43353-0.
 Anderhag, P.; Wickman, P. & Hamza, K. (2015). Signs of taste for science: A methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 10 (2), pp. 339–368.
 Anderson, R. & Helms, J. (2001). The ideal of standards and the reality of schools: Needed Research. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, v.38, pp.3-16.
 Avraamidou, L. (2015). Stories of self and science: Pre-service elementary teachers’ identity wok through time and across contexts. Pedagogies: An International Journal. doi:10.1080/15544 80X.2015.1047837.
 Beijaard, D.; Meijer, P. & Verloop, N. (2004). Reconsidering research on teachers’ professional identity. Teacher and Teacher Education, v. 20, pp.107-128.
 Blumstein D. & Saylan, C. (2007). The failure of environmental education and how we can fix it. PLoS Biol, v.5, (5). doi:10.1371/journal. pbio.0050120.
 Briscoe, C. & Wells, E. (2002). Reforming primary science assessment practices: A case study of one teachers’ professional development through action research. Science Education, v, 86, pp.417-435.
 Burmeister, M., & Eilks, I. (2012). An example of learning about plastics and their evaluation as a contribution to Education for Sustainable Development in secondary school chemistry teaching. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, v.13, 93-102.
 Dahlin, B. (2001). The primacy of cognition – or of perception? A phenomenological critique of the theoretical bases of science education. In F. Bevilacqua, E. Giannetto & Matthews, M. (Eds.). Science education and culture: The role of history and philosophy of science, pp.129-151. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
 Darby, L. (2005). Science students’ perceptions of engaging pedagogy. Research in Science Education, v. 35, pp. 425–445.
 Dewey, J. (2005). Art as experience. London: Penguin Books.
 Egypt National Review Report for Input to the 2016 HLPF (2016). The Arab Republic of Egypt National Voluntary Review on the Sustainable Development, Input to the 2016 High-level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development. Retrieved on: www.sustainabledevelopment.un.org, at: 26/2/2018.
 Egypt National Review Report for Input to the 2016 HLPF (2016). The Arab Republic of Egypt National Voluntary Review on the Sustainable Development, Input to the 2016 High-level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development. Retrieved on: www.sustainabledevelopment.un.org, at: 26/2/2018.
 Eijck, M. & Roth, W. (2007). Improving Science Education for Sustainable Development. PLoS Biology, v. 5 (12), Pp.2763- 2769. Retrieved on: www.plosbiology.org.
 El-Zein, Jabbour; Tekce, Zurayk; Nuwayhid, Khawaja; Tell, Al Mooji; De-Jong, Yassin, and Hogan (2014). Health and ecological sustainability in the Arab world: a matter of survival. NCBI. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62338-7.
 Fun, C. and Maskat, N. (2010). Teacher-Centered Mind Mapping vs Student-Centered Mind Mapping in the Teaching of Accounting at Pre-U Level – An Action Research, International Conference on Learner Diversity 2010. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, v.7(C), 240–246.
 Girod, M. & Wong, D. (2001). An aesthetic (Deweyan) perspective on science learning: Case studies of three fourth graders. The Elementary School Journal, v.102 (3), pp. 199-224.
 Girod, M. (2007). A conceptual overview of the role of beauty and aesthetics in science and science education. Studies in Science Education, v.43 (1), pp.38–61.
 Girod, M., Rau, C. & Schepige, A. (2003). “Appreciating the beauty of science ideas: teaching for aesthetic understanding”. Science Education, v. 87, pp.574-587.
 Girod, M.; Twyman, T. & Wojcikiewicz, S. (2010). “Teaching and learning science for transformative, aesthetic experience”. Journal of Science Teacher Education, v.21, pp.801-824.
 GMES (2017). Global Monitoring for Environment and Security in Africa -GMES & Africa Ref: HRST/ST/G&A/823/05.17. retrieved on: http://www.oss-online.org/en/global-monitoring-program-environment-security-africa-gmes-africa.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. & Schulz, R. ( 2017). What Really Makes Secondary School Students “Want” to Study Physics?. Education Science, November, v.7(4), pp. 84-90. doi:10.3390/educsci7040048
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. (2017). Implication of R.S. Peters’ Notion of Cognitive Perspective and its Implication for Science Education. Educational Philosophical Theory. Retrieved on: www.googlescholar.com. at 28/2/2018.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y.; Kampouropoulou, M. & Fokiali, P. (2015). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in School Science Education: How Science Learning Can Help Raise Environmental Awareness. Scientific Research Publishing, Published Online May 2015 in SciRes. Retrieved on: http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ce.2015.68077.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. & Schulz, R. (2014). Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their contribution to Science Education. Science and Education, v.23, pp.1963-2006.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. (2014). Reclaiming the value of wonder in Science Education. In Wonder-Full Education: The Century of Wonder in Teaching and Learning across the Curriculum. Egan, K.; Cant, A.; Judson, G. (Edrs) Routledge: New York, NY, USA, pp.40-66.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. & Stivaktakis, S. (2010). Encouraging Involvement with School Science. Curriculum Pedagogy, v. 5, pp. 138-162.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. (2005). On Humanistic Science Education, ERIC Document, ED506504. Retrieved on: http://files.eric.ed.gov/full-text/ED506504.pdf. at: 28/2/2018.
 Hadzigeorgiou, Y. and Schulz, R. (2017). “What Really Makes Secondary School Students. Research gate, November. doi:10.3390/educsci7040084.
 Hammer, D. & Schifter, D. (2001). Practices of inquiry in teaching and research. Cognition and Instruction, v.19, pp.441-478.
 Hidi, S.; Renninger, A. & Krapp, A. (2004). Interest, a motivational construct that combines affective and cognitive functioning. In Dai, D. & Sternberg, R. (Eds.).Motivation, emotion and cognition, (pp. 99–115), Mahwah: Erlbaum.
 Hine, G. (2013). The importance of action research in teacher education programs. Issues in Educational Research, v. 23 (2): Special Issue.
 Hobbs, L. (2012). Examining the aesthetic dimensions of teaching: Relationships between teacher knowledge, identity and passion. Teaching and Teacher Education, v. 28, pp.718–727.
 Hobbs, L. and Kelly L. (2017). “The Heart of the Educator: Aesthetic Experience Shaping Knowledge, Identity, and Passion”, Bellocchi, A., Quigley, C.& Otrel, K.(Eds.), Exploring Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education Research, Cultural Studies of Science Education, V. 3, (pp. 5-82) Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-43353-0.
 Hobbs, L. and Kelly L. (2015). “The Heart of the Educator: Aesthetic Experience Shaping Knowledge, Identity, and Passion”, Bellocchi, A., Quigley, C.& Otrel, K.(Eds.), Exploring Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education Research. Cultural Studies of Science Education, v. 3, (pp. 5-82) Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-43353-0.
 Hobbs, L. (2013). Boundary crossings of out-of-field teachers: Locating learning possibilities amid disruption. In J. Langan-Fox & C. L. Cooper (Eds.), Boundary-spanning in organizations: Network, influence, and conflict (pp. 7–28). New York: Routledge.
 Holbrook, J. (2009). Meeting challenges to sustainable development through science and technology education. Science Education International, v.20 (1/2), pp. 44-59.
 Howitt, C. (2007). Pre-service elementary teachers’ perceptions of factors in a holistic methods course influencing their confidence in teaching science. Research in Science Education, 37 (1), pp.41–58.
 Hunsik, K.; Scharmann, L.; Kang, S. & Noh, T. (2010). Cognitive conflict and situational interest as factors influencing conceptual change. Science Education, v.5, pp.383-405.
 Jakobson, B. & Wickman, P. (2008). “Art in science class vs. science in art class: a Study in Elementary School. Education & Didactique, v.2 (3), 141–157.
 Kagan, S. (2011). “Art and Sustainability. Connecting Patterns for a Culture of Complexity. Lüneburg: Leuphana University.
 Klassen, S. & Froese-Klassen, C. (2014). The role of interest in learning science through stories. Interchange, v. 45, pp. 133-151.
 Koballa, T. & Glynn, S. (2007). “Attitudinal and motivational constructs in science learning”. In Abell, S. & Lederman, N. (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Science Education, (pp. 80-120). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
 Kraft, N. (2002). “Teacher research as a way to engage in critical reflection: A case study”. Reflective Practicum, v. 3(2), pp.175-189.
 Lemake, J. (2001). Articulating communities: Sociocultural perspective on science education, Journal of research in science teaching, v.38, pp.296-316.
 Makrakis, V. & Kostoulas-Makrakis, N. (2012). “The challenges of ICTs to online climate change education for sustainable development: The ExConTra learning paradigm”, In S. A. Anwar (Ed.), Proceedings of the 5th Conference on eLearning Excellence in the Middle East - Sustainable Innovation in Education (pp. 594- 605). Dubai, UAE: Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-University.
 Makrakis, V. (2011). “ICT-enabled education for sustainable development: Merging theory with praxis”, In M. Youssef & S. A. Anwar (Eds.). Proceedings of the 4th Annual Conference on e-Learning Excellence in the Middle East 2011 ñ in Search for New Paradigms for Re-engineering Education (pp. 410-419), Dubai, UAE: Hamdan Bin Mohammed e-University.
 McIntyre, J. & Hobson, A. (2015). Supporting beginner teacher identity development: External mentors and the third space. Research Papers in Education. doi: 10.1080/02671522.2015.1015438.
 Metha, R. (2016). Why teachers should care about beauty in science education?. ResearchGate, June, 83-86.
Retrieved on: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306013099.
 Mezirow, J. (2000). “Learning to think like an adult: Core concepts of transformation theory”, In J. Mezirow & Associates (Eds.), Learning as Transformation: Critical perspectives on a theory in progress (pp. 3-34). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
 Murphy A. (2014). Integrating Aesthetics into professional development for Teachers of English Learners. TESOL Journal, v. 5 (1), March, pp.82-104.
 Neumann, A. (2006). Professing passion: Emotion in the scholarship of professors at research universities. American Educational Research Journal, v.43 (3), 381-424.
 Ostergaard, E., Dahlin, B. & Hugo, A. (2008). Doing phenomenology in science education: a research review. Studies in Science Education, v.44 (2), pp.93–121.
 Ponte, P., Ax, J., Beijaard, D., & Wubbels, T. (2004). Teachers’ development of professional knowledge through action research and the facilitation of this by teacher educators. Teaching and Teacher Education, v.20 (6), pp.589-605.
 Potvin, P. & Hasni, A. (2014). Interest, motivation and attitude toward science and technology at K-12 Levels: A systemic review of 12 years of educational research. Science Education, v. 50, pp. 85-129.
 Pugh, K. & Girod, M. (2007). Science, Art, and Experience: Constructing a Science Pedagogy from Dewey’s Aesthetics. Journal of Science Teacher Education, v.18, pp.9-27.
 Quay, J. (2013). More than relations between self, others and nature: outdoor education and aesthetic experience. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, v.13 (2), pp.142-157, doi: 10.1080/14729679.2012.746846.
 Reason, P. (2007). Education for ecology: Science, aesthetics, spirit and ceremony. Management Learning, v.38 (1), pp. 27-44.
 SDSN (2015). Getting Started with Sustainable Development Goals, Concept Note, and OECD 2015, retrieved on: http://unsdsn.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/151211-getting-started-guide-FINAL-PDF-.pdf.
 Song, Y. (2010). Art in Nature and School. Journal of Aesthetic Education, v.44 (3), pp.96-108.
 Sterling, S. (2001). Sustainable education. Re-visioning learning and change, Devon: Green Books for the Schumacher Society. Retrieved on: www.books.google.com.eg at 27/2/2018.
 Summers, M. & Childs, A. (2007). Student science teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development: An empirical study of three postgraduate training cohorts. Science & Technological Education, v.25 (3), pp.307-327.
 Tytler, R. (2007). Re-imagining science education: Engaging students in science for Australia’s future. Camberwell: Australian Council for Educational Research.
 UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) (2014). United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development: Draft international implementation scheme. Retrieved on http://portal. UNESCO.org/education/en/ev.php 26/2/2018.
 UNESCO (2012). ESD Sourcebook: Learning & Training Tools, No. 4. Paris, UNESCO. http://unesdoc. unesco.org/images/0021/002163/216383e.pdf.
 UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) (2004). United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development: Draft international implementation scheme. Retrieved at :December 20, 2017, on: http://portal. UNESCO.org/education/en/ev.php.
 Van Zee, E.; Lay, D. & Roberts, D. (2003). Fostering collaborative inquiries by prospective and practicing elementary and middle school teachers. Science Education, v. 87(4), pp.588-612.
 Wang, M.; Eccles, J. & Kenny, S. (2013). Not lack of abilities but lack of choice: Individual and gender differences in choice of careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Psychological Science, v. 2013, pp.1-6.
 “Want to Study Physics?”, Education Sciences, November, v.7, pp.84- 95. doi:10.3390/educsci7040084.
 Wellington, J. (2003). “Science education for citizenship and a sustainable future”. Pastoral Care in Education, v.21 (30), pp.13-18.
 Wickman, P. (2006). Aesthetic Experience in Science Education: Learning and Meaning-Making as Situated Talk and Action, Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Ass.
Published
2019-03-03
How to Cite
Abuzied, A. (2019). Oriented program through Action Research for Biology teachers to develop their meaningful aesthetic understanding of biology and acquire the Education for Sustainable Development requirements. International Journal of Research in Educational Sciences. (IJRES), 2(02), 343 - 401. Retrieved from http://www.iafh.net/index.php/IJRES/article/view/110
Section
Articles